Author: Raelene Loong

Project Q, Q Research, Q3

Project Q is highlighted in this new piece on ‘quantum philanthropy’


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Program director for international peace and security at the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Stephen Del Rosso, writes in The Chronicle of Philanthropy on the increasing need for philanthropists to help further public understanding of the societal implications of quantum innovation, highlighting Project Q’s leading role in the effort.

Del Rosso writes, “Quantum presents a ripe target of opportunity for foundations that have long supported efforts to explore and explain complex notions rooted in science — from nuclear security to climate change — that affect our everyday lives. Moreover, through its grant making to scholars and policy experts and increasing interest in broadly disseminating their findings, philanthropy is well-positioned to take on this challenge.”

The article describes research endeavours by tech giants Microsoft, Google and IBM, as well as government agencies and major universities such as the University of Sydney’s Australian Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology (AINST) who are working on different developmental paths to a fully functioning quantum computer.

“Philanthropy is unhindered by the crisis-to-crisis mode of government operations or the disciplinary imperatives of the academy, so it is ideally suited to sponsor investigation into the relevance of quantum approaches today and in the future.” (more…)

Project Q, Q Research, Q3

Quantum Leap: China’s satellite and the new arms race


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Q3 speaker Taylor Owen recently wrote a piece for Foreign Affairs that explores the effects and implications of new quantum technologies on international relations, which features Project Q’s work and research.

The piece looks at the recent launch of China’s quantum satellite into orbit, the private and public partnerships in the development of quantum computers, and if in understanding these new quantum technologies we are able to better understand the universe.

Taylor Owen is an assistant professor of digital media and global affairs at the University of British Columbia and a Senior Fellow at the Columbia Journalism School. Listen to his talk below on the final roundtable event at the third annual Q Symposium last February.

Project Q, Q3

Q3 Symposium Highlight Video with Project Q Announcement


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Watch the highlight video of the 3rd annual Q Symposium (Q3), which was held on February 11-13, 2016 at the Q Station in Manly.

The Q team have just returned from Singapore where they attended the International Conference on Quantum Communication, Measurement and Computing (QCMC) at the National University of Singapore. The team conducted many interviews of attendees and professionals, ranging from quantum physicists to computer scientists to a global strategist, as part of the production of Project Q’s documentary film.

The team have also decided to postpone the upcoming 4th annual Q Symposium (Q4) to February 2018 to focus on producing the digital green paper and edited volume publications, as well as the treatment for the documentary feature film as part of Project Q.

In the meanwhile, keep up to date with the Project by subscribing to our blog updates at the bottom of this page or follow us on Twitter @ProjectQSydney.

Image above: The Q Team interviewing Alex Bocharov from Microsoft Research at the QCMC Conference in Singapore

Q3

Watch the final roundtable event from Q3 Symposium on peace and security in a quantum age


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The final roundtable from the third annual Q Symposium held on February 11-13 this year is now available online. View the full recording below.

The roundtable wraps up the conference and features a discussion panel of Professors Azar Gat (Tel Aviv University), Karen O’Brien (University of Oslo), Christian Reus-Smit (University of Queensland), Assistant Professor Taylor Owen (University of British Columbia), Stephen Del Rosso (Carnegie Corporation) and Professor James Der Derian (University of Sydney).

Q Research, Q3

Is it time for a quantum leap in climate change?


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Professor Karen O’Brien from the University of Oslo joined the Q Symposium (Q3) this year on the Final Roundtable to discuss applications of quantum concepts in understanding social change.

Professor O’Brien recently wrote an opinion piece for WIREs Climate Change titled ‘Climate change and social transformations: is it time for a quantum leap?’ which explores the metaphysical, metaphorical and meaningful significance of quantum social theory for understandings of social change.

You can read the op-ed here.

Project Q, Q3

Q3 Symposium featured in latest SSPS Review magazine


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Screen Shot 2016-06-08 at 3.03.22 PMThe latest issue of the SSPS Review, a digital magazine published by the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Sydney recently featured a review of the third annual Q Symposium.

The SSPS Review celebrates the achievements of the school – staff, students and alumni, as well as donors who make a significant contribution to research and the student experience.

The piece is written by Project Q director James Der Derian and research assistant Maryanne Crooks, and provides an overview of the events that occurred at the third annual Q Symposium last February.

You can view and download the latest issue of the SSPS Review here, and you can read the piece from Page 30-33.

All, Q3

Watch the Quantum Moment and Matter panels from the Q3 Symposium


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View the full recordings of the Quantum Moment and Matter panels from the third annual Q Symposium, held in February this year.

The Quantum Moment panel was opened by Associate Professor Michael Biercuk (Quantum Control Lab, University of Sydney) on the new quantum revolution and the unique opportunities provided by current quantum research. His presentation was followed by Professor Shohini Ghose (Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada) on quantum diversity and her interesting take on what it takes to be a quantum feminist. Finally, Assistant Professor Bentley B. Allan closed the panel with his presentation on the implications of quantum interpretations and technologies for the cosmological basis of political discourses.

The Quantum Matter panel began with Professor Andrew Dzurak (University of New South Wales) who presented his work in silicon-based quantum computing at the Centre for Quantum Computer Technology. Professor Chao-yang Lu (University of Science and Technology China) then discussed his research in perfecting single photons for multi-photon experiments, and was followed by Professor Stephen Bartlett (University of Sydney) who described new approaches to understanding quantum physics in the macroscopic world.

Q Research

Malcolm Turnbull pledges support for quantum innovation


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Australian prime minister Malcolm Turnbull today attended the launch of a new quantum computing complex at the University of New South Wales (UNSW).

Turnbull, following in the footsteps of Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau last week at the Perimeter Institute, spoke to the press at UNSW on the importance quantum computing has in building Australia’s National Innovation and Science Agenda.

The new complex is an extension of the currently running Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology lead by Professor Michelle Simmons, and includes new facilities for research in developing quantum computational devices.

Two days ago, the University of Sydney officially launched the Sydney Nanoscience Hub with a two-day symposium of speakers from all around the world presenting their research in quantum computation and nanoscience technologies. Their launch included a visit from Norman Whitaker, Head of Research at Microsoft, who likened this research to “moonshot” ideas, much like the moon landing and other breakthroughs in science and technology.

While it may seem that both universities are butting heads against one another in a quantum computing race, the launch of both labs this week is exciting news for innovation in Australia and more importantly proves how much of a world leader Australia is in the development of quantum technologies.

Photo: AAP Image

All, Q Research

Einstein vs. Schrödinger: collaboration, competition and uncertainty


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“Neither Schrödinger nor Einstein liked what they found in the subatomic world”

What would Einstein and Schrödinger’s theories of the mysterious quantum world be like had they not been so notoriously famous? Where did they begin, and how did they deal with their newfound fame for ideas that were inevitably ‘unproven speculation’?

Paul Halpern’s latest book Einstein’s Dice and Schrödinger Cat: How Two Great Minds Battled Quantum Randomness to Create a Unified Theory of Physics uncovers the challenges set before two of the greatest minds of the past century.

In this article from New Scientist, Halpern’s book is described as a fascinating look into both Einstein and Schrödinger’s careers, from being collaborators at an early stage, to becoming fierce competitors. Halpern’s new book is also a study of the long tail that marks many distinguished careers in science.

More interestingly though, the article does point out the power and importance of collaboration, and ponders the ‘what ifs’ of Einstein and Schrödinger’s progress in their research had they passed on their wisdom and insight to their students or colleagues.

Photo: Wikimedia

All, Q Research

Quantum theory to quantum biology


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Professor of Physics Jim Al-Khalili from the University of Surrey presented a talk at TEDx earlier this year, which explores the idea that quantum effects can be observed at a biological level.

In his presentation, Professor Al-Khalili explains how quantum entanglement may answer the question of how birds are able to navigate the Earth’s via its invisible magnetic fields (which are a hundred times weaker than a fridge magnet), or why quantum tunnelling could be the key to how the sun shines.

“Quantum biology is about looking for the trivial, the counter-intuitive ideas in quantum mechanics and to see if they do indeed play an important role in describing the processes of life,” said Professor Al-Khalili.

His latest book with Professor Johnjoe McFadden is titled “Life on the Edge: The Coming of Age of Quantum Biology“, which looks at these ideas in depth and seeks to answer the many questions about the origin of life itself.

Image: an illustration of a robin (via RSPB UK)